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Biology Botany Evolution & genetics Science Taxonomy Zoology

New species of 2016

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2016 has been an absolutely shait year, so I am not going to do a list of main events. I think we better get seriously drunk and forget the sorry business. However! As every year, new species are discovered, and not all of them tiny bacteria, gray mushrooms, or minuscule fish from lake Malawi. I found a bunch of them, and they are delightful!

It is said, convincingly, that the most likely place you can discover a new species, is in your own back yard. Every year, new insects and vertebrates are discovered. Problem is, of course, that to know you have found a new critter, you need to intimately know aaaaaaalll the other known relatives of that little worm. Or fly. Or whatever. That, generally, is why new species are almost always found by scientists. Besides, sometimes new species can only be indentified by DNA, and though sequencers are getting ridiculously cheap… well. It certainly is a special-interest. On the other hand: you would be allowed to name a new species. And name a slimy, disgusting blob after your nemesis. Or a pretty flower for your dear one. Personally, I am with the Ziggy Stardust snake.

The Phuket horned tree agamid (Acanthosaura phuketensis), Photograph: Montri Sumontha/WWF

The Phuket horned tree agamid (Acanthosaura phuketensis), Photo: Montri Sumontha/WWF

Murina kontumensis, Photo: Truong Son Nguyen/WWF

Murina kontumensis, Photo: Truong Son Nguyen/WWF

rainbow-headed snake, Parafimbrios lao, Photo: Alexandre Teynié/WWF

rainbow-headed snake, Parafimbrios lao, Photo: Alexandre Teynié/WWF

Giant Tortoise (Chelonoidis donfaustol). Photo: Adalgisa Caccone

Giant Tortoise (Chelonoidis donfaustol). Photo: Adalgisa Caccone

Frog, Leptolalax isos, Photo: Jodi Rowley / Australian Museum/WWF

Frog, Leptolalax isos, Photo: Jodi Rowley / Australian Museum/WWF

Anglerfish (Lasiognathus dinema). Image Credit: Theodore W. Pietsc

Anglerfish (Lasiognathus dinema). Image Credit: Theodore W. Pietsc

newt, Tylototriton anguliceps, Photo: Porrawee Pomchote/WWF

newt, Tylototriton anguliceps, Photo: Porrawee Pomchote/WWF

Though extinct, I thought Homo Naledi could deserve a place here. It is always exciting when we learn a little bit more about our ancestors.

Homo Naledi. Image: National Geographics

Homo Naledi. Image: National Geographics

benteh

“Incuriosity is the oddest and most foolish failing there is”. All-round nerd with a tendency to poke things with a stick to see what happens. Doodler, artist, bookbinder, photographer, illustrator, graphic designer, web developer.

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